John Mallaney

In The Frame

Posts tagged ‘Sparrowhawk’

Sparrowhawk

Here are a few shots of a stunning Sparrowhawk taken in Aylesbury on a very gloomy day indeed.  I wonder if this could be the same bird that perched in a tree in my garden a couple of months ago taking advantage of the poor little birds at my feeders.  See here:  https://wordpress.com/post/johnmallaney.com/7366

© [John Mallaney] and [www.johnmallaney.com], [2017]. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to [John Mallaney] and [www.johnmallaney.com] with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

Sparrowhawk

The last shots of the Sparrowhawk that temporarily resided in my garden late last year.  Unfortunately, his cover was finally blown when the last of the leaves disappeared from the tree.  No cover equals no rich pickings!

© [John Mallaney] and [www.johnmallaney.com], [2017]. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to [John Mallaney] and [www.johnmallaney.com] with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Sparrowhawk Kill (*Graphic*)

As previously mentioned in my last post when an opportunity arises to document a  predator at work it is very difficult to resist.  The picture on the ground was taken from my window and shows the aftermath of a successful attack on a goldfinch.  The remaining pictures were taken up my garden tree as the Sparrowhawk does what comes naturally.  Some may find the pictures upsetting but this is just another of many examples of the circle of life.

© [John Mallaney] and [www.johnmallaney.com], [2016]. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to [John Mallaney] and [www.johnmallaney.com] with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

Sparrowhawk

This magnificent Sparrowhawk has decided to perch himself on a tree in my back garden for the last few days.  The reasons for his appearance was not immediately obvious to me until I observed him acrobatically attacking the finches which I regularly feed (note – I have temporarily stopped feeding them).  The Sparrowhawk is only doing what comes naturally and the results of his efforts will be documented in my next post.  Those of you who do not appreciate nature in action may wish to look away.

© [John Mallaney] and [www.johnmallaney.com], [2016]. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to [John Mallaney] and [www.johnmallaney.com] with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Sparrowhawk

Here are a few shots of a Sparrowhawk that was soaring alongside a Common Buzzard (see my last post) at Western Turville near Aylesbury.

© [John Mallaney] and [john mallaney In The Frame], [2014]. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to [John Mallaney] and [john mallaney In The Frame] with appropriate and specific direction to the original content

 

Brrrr, from the last few weeks….

Although I am Scottish and supposed to be acclimatised to the driech weather, it does come as a shock to the system when we get these occasional cold snaps down south.  Indeed, spare a thought for some of the poor wee blighters below whose daily diet is ruined by the white nasty stuff that is snow.  If scraping for food is not enough, I caught the picture below of a hungry Sparrowhawk (at a distance), which had rested on a neighbour’s roof whilst terrifying a flock of birds of the smaller variety.  I also managed to take some final pictures of the Waxwings, whose numbers have definitely dwindled (as have the berries), and who by now are probably tucked up safe and sound back home in their Scandinavian nests.

Blackbird chilling Sparrowhawk on the hunt on neighbours roof A well fed Waxwing Blackbird braving the snow Waxwing 3 (2) Waxwing 4 (2) Chaffinch 5 (2) An energetic Hare Hare Bird on a wire

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